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Blog Editor’s Note: One of our alert readers sent us a link to this item (always appreciated). We discussed a similar article about Android phones in 2018.

One of the first things with this item we were struck by was that, while the “Tech Times” has a New York City address, the article was clearly not written or edited by someone for whom English is their first language. A bit of research on the internet showed:

  • Some observers and former employees describe the company as a “robo click farm”
  • Several reports by former employees of late paychecks and day-to-day operations being directed from outside the New York office
  • Very low ratings on Indeed.com by former employees
  • Ownership clouded by a series of holding companies, though an apparent strong connection to the Philippines, or beyond

The article suggests using Tenorshare iAnyGo which one review calls one of the best apps that is “…free at your fingerprints.” We also found evidence that non-native English speakers developed the Tenorshare website and wrote glowing reviews on other sites.

Perhaps this is all just evidence of the “world” in the “world wide web.”  And of folks trying to maximize their clicks and profits. 

Perhaps it part of a larger, concerted effort to undermine the credibility of America’s GPS services and make life in the west just a bit more chaotic.  We have certainly seen enough of those.  

 

 

How to Spoof GPS Location on Your iPhone

By Staff Reporter Tech Times

Your phone requires location to be precise with weather and mapping services. Spoofing GPS location means to trick your phone with the fake GPS location. The radio transmitter near your location is fooled to show the accurate coordinates while the Spoofer interferes with its service.

At any time you as a teenager want to hide from parents or keep away from people keeping a tab on you, faking location is always a better idea. While you are spoofing location on your iPhone, the satellite isn’t doing much of a good job to find your spot.

Another good reason to fake a location can be to lurk around the town where you have never been and traveling the next weekend.  Moreover, you can make fun of your friend as if you are out of town in a location-sharing app while you are home watching Netflix shows.

From Scamadvisor.com:  “We scanned techtimes.com for several indicators and we think the website may be a scam. Exercise extreme caution when using this website.” 

We are not providing a link.

Brad P

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