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Blog Editor’s Note: Thanks to RNTF member Omer Sharar, CEO of InfiniDome, for calling this item from January of this year to our attention.

Several interesting things about the below article from “El Economista.”

First that folks in Mexico are keeping track of jammer use in these thefts.  In about 85% of 3,400 thefts jammers were used.

We have not seen any figures from the United States or Europe, but it is easy to imagine that they would be similar. With jammers so easy to obtain and operate, if you were going to steal a commercial truck or cargo, why wouldn’t you use one? 

Why have we not seen similar information about the US and elsewhere?  It is likely that law enforcement and/ or industry have been collecting it. It is also likely they really don’t want it made public. Doing so could encourage more use. And they probably don’t trust policy makers to enact laws and provide funding to address the problem.

Another interesting item in the article is that Mexico has prohibited not just jamming, but also bans “… manufacture, market, distribute, install, buy, carry, use or operate equipment that hinders or cancels audio, video and data communication signals.”  In the US it is legal to build and own the equipment, you just can’t use it.  So if the police are conducting an investigation and find someone with equipment not being operated, there is nothing they can do based just on that. Not even a fine.

Finally, Mexico has put some teeth into its anti-jamming law. From 12 to 15 years in prison is possible for individuals. Up to 18 years if for a government official. Penalties in the US and many countries are pretty much limited to fines. 

 

Anti-jammer law, which bans video, voice and data blockers, takes effect this Saturday

Nicolas Lucas

This Saturday, January 25, 2020, a reform to various articles of the Federal Telecommunications Law and the Federal Criminal Code will come into effect, which aims to reduce crimes committed with the use of devices that block wireless communications.

This Saturday, January 25, 2020, a reform to various articles of the Federal Telecommunications and Broadcasting Law ( LFTR ) and the Federal Criminal Code will come into force , which aims to reduce crimes committed with the use of devices that block communications wireless.

This is the so-called “anti-jammer law” , derived from a reform to articles 190 bis of the LFTR and 168 of the Penal Code that will now allow the authorities to sanction with penalties of 12 to 15 years in prison to individuals who manufacture, market, distribute, install, buy, carry, use or operate equipment that hinders or cancels audio, video and data communication signals, thus making it difficult to help or track people and / or vehicles when a crime is committed.

The sanction rises to 18 years for public officials who fall into this assumption, if they do not previously have the corresponding authorization.

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